Translate

Saturday, January 20, 2018

Actress Viola Davis' Powerful Speech At The Women's March 2018, Los Angeles, California (Video & Unofficial Transcript)

Edited by Azizi Powell

This pancocojams post is a video and an unofficial transcript of Viola Davis' powerful speech at the 2018 Women's March in Los Angeles, California. Other Women's Marches were held in a number of cities throughout the United States.

The content of this post is presented for sociological, cultural, political, motivational, and inspirational purposes.

All copyrights remain with their owners.

Thanks to Viola Davis, and all the organizers and participants of the Women's March, Me Too Movement, and Resist! Movements.
-snip-
Click https://www.nytimes.com/2018/01/20/us/womens-march.html for a New York Times article about the Women's Marches in the United States (January 20,2018).

and

This daily kos diary includes photos and comments about the Women's Marches in various United States cities: https://www.dailykos.com/stories/2018/1/20/1734458/-Stronger-than-ever-Check-out-the-massive-roaring-crowds-across-the-nation-for-the-Women-s-March. [Warning for those working at schools or other public institutions: There's one instance of profanity occurs in the comments.]

****
SHOWCASE VIDEO: Viola Davis speaks at Women's March



CNN, Published on Jan 20, 2018

Actress Viola Davis gave a passionate speech at the Women's March in Los Angeles.

****
UNOFFICIAL TRANSCRIPT OF VIOLA DAVIS' SPEECH AT WOMEN'S MARCH 2018
"In the words of my fellow American, Malcolm X, I'm gonna make it plain.

In 1877, America, the greatest country on this planet, put laws in place called the Jim Crow laws. And the Jim Crow laws restricted the rights to quadroons, octoroons, Blacks, Hispanics, Indians, and Malays. Restricted medical. Restricted relationships. Restricted education.Restricted life.

It told us that we were "less than" and it came on the heels of the 13th Amendment. It came on the heels of fifty five individual great Americans writing the greatest document called the Constitution of the United States, saying "We the people".


Now the reason why those destructive laws came into place, I think can be greatly described by Martin Luther King. And what he said about time is. He said "I'm not ready to wait a hundred years, or two hundred years for things to change. That I think actually that time is neutral. That it can either be used constructively or destructively. That human progress rarely rolls in on inevitability. It is through human dedication, an effort, that we move forward. And that when we don't work, what happens is that time actually becomes an ally to the primitive forces of social stagnation. And the guardians of the status quo are in their oxygen tanks keeping the old order alive.

And so that time needs to be helped by every single moment doing right.

And the reason why these Jim Crow laws were in place that stifled my rights and your rights is because we fell asleep.

We fall asleep when we're moving ahead and we don't look to the left and the right and see that we're no including people in this move ahead. Because really, at the end of the day, we only move forward when it doesn't cost of anything. But I'm here today saying that no one and nothing can be great unless it cost you something.

One out of every five women will be sexually assaulted and raped before she reaches the age of eighteen. One out of six boys. If you are a woman of color and you are raped before you reach the age of eighteen, than you are 66% more likely to be sexually assaulted again.

Seventy percent of girls who are sex trafficed are girls of color. They are coming out of the foster care system. They a re coming out of poverty. It is a billion dollar industry. When they go into the sex trafficing business- and they call it a business, trust me - more than likely they are gang raped.

I am speaking today not just for the 'Me Toos', 'cause I was a 'Me Too,' but when I raise my hand, I am aware of all the women who are still in silence. The women who are faceless. The women who don't have the money and don't have the constitution and who don't have the confidence and who don't have the images in our media that gives them a sense of self-worth enough to break their silence that's rooted in the shame of assault, that's rooted in the stigma of assault.

Written on the Statue of Liberty is "Come, Come you tiredless, poor, yearning to breath free- to breath free."

Every single day, your job as an American citizen is not just to fight for your rights. It's to fight for the right of every individual that is taking a breath, whose heart is pumping and breathing on this earth..

And like the originators of this "Me Too", the Fannie Lou Hamers, the Recy Taylor who in 1944 was gang raped by six White men, and she spoke up. Rosa Parks fought for her rights. She was silenced. To the Tarana Burkes. To the originators, the first women to speak out -it cost them something. Nothing and no one can be great without a cost.

Listen, I am always introduced as an award winning actor. But my testimony is one of poverty. My testimony is one of being sexually assaulted, and was very much seeing a childhood that was robbed from me. And I know that every single day when I think of that, I know that the trauma of those events are still with me today. And that's what drives me to, to the voting booth. That's what allows me to listen to the women who are still in silence. That's what allows me, even to become a citizen on this planet, is the fact that we are here to connect. That we are here as three hundred and twenty four million people living on this earth to know that every day that we breath and we live that we gotta bring up everyone with us.

I stand in solidarity with all women who raise their hands because I know that it was not easy. And my hope for the future, my hope- and I do hope- that we never go back.

That it's not a just about clapping your hands and screaming and shouting every time someone says something that sounds good. It's about keeping it rolling once you go home."
-snip-
This is my transcription of Viola Davis' speech* which is shown in the video given above. I used italics to represent the words that Ms Davis emphasized in this speech. The space near the beginning of this speech represents a (I believe purposeful pause that Ms. Davis made in her remarks.

This transcription doesn't include audience cheers to this speech.

Additions and corrections are welcome.

For the record, Ms. Davis isn't looking at any notes while she deliver this speech.

Here are links to some information about the four specific women that Viola Davis gave a shout out to in her speech:
From https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Fannie_Lou_Hamer
"Fannie Lou Hamer (/ˈheɪmər/; born Fannie Lou Townsend; October 6, 1917 – March 14, 1977) was an American voting rights activist, a leader in the Civil Rights Movement, and philanthropist who worked primarily in Mississippi. She was instrumental in organizing Mississippi's Freedom Summer for the Student Nonviolent Coordinating Committee (SNCC). She was the vice-chair of the Mississippi Freedom Democratic Party, which she represented at the 1964 Democratic National Convention in Atlantic City, New Jersey."...

**
From https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Recy_Taylor
"Recy Taylor (née Corbitt; December 31, 1919 – December 28, 2017)[2]:297 was an African American woman from Abbeville in Henry County, Alabama, US. She was born and raised in a sharecropping family in the Jim Crow era Southern United States. Taylor's refusal to remain silent about a brutal rape she suffered, perpetrated by white men, led to organizing in the African-American community on behalf of justice and civil rights."

**
From https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Rosa_Parks
"Rosa Louise McCauley Parks (February 4, 1913 – October 24, 2005) was an activist in the Civil Rights Movement, whom the United States Congress called "the first lady of civil rights" and "the mother of the freedom movement".[1]

On December 1, 1955, in Montgomery, Alabama, Parks refused to obey bus driver James F. Blake's order to give up her seat in the "colored section" to a white passenger, after the whites-only section was filled. Parks was not the first person to resist bus segregation. Others had taken similar steps, including Bayard Rustin in 1942,[2] Irene Morgan in 1946, Lillie Mae Bradford in 1951,[3] Sarah Louise Keys in 1952, and the members of the ultimately successful Browder v. Gayle 1956 lawsuit (Claudette Colvin, Aurelia Browder, Susie McDonald, and Mary Louise Smith) who were arrested in Montgomery for not giving up their bus seats months before Parks. NAACP organizers believed that Parks was the best candidate for seeing through a court challenge after her arrest for civil disobedience in violating Alabama segregation laws, although eventually her case became bogged down in the state courts while the Browder v. Gayle case succeeded.[4][5]

Parks' act of defiance and the Montgomery bus boycott became important symbols of the modern Civil Rights Movement. She became an international icon of resistance to racial segregation"...

**
From https://hellogiggles.com/news/me-too-movement-black-woman/ "Actually, a black woman created the "Me Too" movement 10 years ago" by CAITLIN GALLAGHER, October 18, 2017
..."Although most people think the idea originated with Milano, the original “Me Too” movement was started by Tarana Burke, and she created the campaign for the youth organization Just Be Inc. in 2007"....


****
Thanks for visiting pancocojams.

Visitor comments are welcome.

Friday, January 19, 2018

Afro- Colombian Mapalé Music & Dance From San Basilio De Palenque

Edited by Azizi Powell

This pancocojams post showcases a video of traditional Afro-Colombian music, dancing, and chanting.

Information about Colombian palenques and about San Basilio De Palenque in particular is included in this post along with selected comments from this video's discussion thread.

The content of this post is presented for historical, cultural, entertainment, and aesthetic purposes.

All copyrights remain with their owners.

Thanks to all those who are featured in this video. Thanks also to all those who are quoted in this post and thanks to the publisher of this video on YouTube.

****
PALENQUES IN COLOMBIAN HISTORY
From https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Quilombo
A quilombo (Portuguese pronunciation: [kiˈlõbu]; from the Kimbundu word kilombo) is a Brazilian hinterland settlement founded by people of African origin including the Quilombolas, or Maroons. Most of the inhabitants of quilombos (called quilombolas) were escaped slaves and, in some cases, later these escaped African slaves would help provide shelter and homes to other minorities of marginalised Portuguese, Brazilian aboriginals, Jews[citation needed] and Arabs,[citation needed] and/or other non-black, non-slave Brazilians. However, the documentation on runaway slave communities typically uses the term mocambo, an Ambundu word meaning "hideout", to describe the settlements. A mocambo is typically much smaller than a quilombo. Quilombo was not used until the 1670s and then primarily in more southerly parts of Brazil.

A similar settlement exists in the Spanish-speaking countries of Latin America, and is called a palenque. Its inhabitants are palenqueros who speak various Spanish-African-based creole languages.
-snip-
Italics added to highlight these sentences.

**
From https://www.wola.org/analysis/palenques-legacy-afro-colombian-resistance/
"Numerous palenques, or free towns for escaped slaves, gradually emerged at different moments and in different regions of Colombia in the late 17th and early 18th centuries. One of the most important and influential of these is Palenque de San Basilio, which was first recognized in 1713 and designated by UNESCO in 2005 as a Masterpiece of the Oral and Intangible Heritage of Humanity. Today, Palenque de San Basilio stands as monument to resistance and the fight for a better life in Afro-Colombian communities."...

**
From https://www.smithsonianmag.com/travel/colombia-dispatch-4-palenque-an-afro-colombian-community-87781979/ Colombia Dispatch 4: Palenque: An Afro-Colombian Community
"Four hundred years ago, escaped slaves formed Palenque. Today, the Colombian town celebrates its African roots By Kenneth Fletcher, MITHSONIAN.COM, OCTOBER 28, 2008

Centuries ago, escaped slaves built isolated forts in the jungles that surround Cartagena, once Colombia’s main port for incoming slaves. Today, the Afro-Colombian inhabitants of San Basilio de Palenque, a village just over an hour from Cartagena, have preserved many of the customs of their African ancestors.

I wander around the dusty streets and of the small town on a scorching hot day, listening to residents speaking a local Creole tongue. A mixture of African languages with Spanish and Portuguese, it sounds a lot like the Bantu languages of central Africa. Although the town now has electricity and running water in most homes, locals still gather at the creek to wash clothes, chat and bathe. In the center of town there’s a statue of town founder Benkos Bioho breaking out of chains. Locals say he established Palenque in 1603 with 36 other escaped slaves.

While most other strongholds for escaped slaves eventually fell, this one survived because of its isolation among the hills and swamps about 30 miles outside Cartagena. Locals claim that in 1713 the inhabitants declared it the first independent community in the Americas. Escaped slaves would head to Palenque, knowing that was their chance at freedom. But several decades ago, that same isolation led residents, called Palenqueros, to leave the village for big cities in search of work.

Today, colorfully dressed Palenquera women commute to Cartagena to sell candy and fruit on the streets, while many men work in construction and paving roads. But when Palenqueros first arrived in the cities they encountered racism and were mocked for their strange language. Out of embarrassment, many refrained from observing their traditional customs.

Near the town square, I sat down with Edwin Valdez Hernandez, a charismatic young instructor at the Batata Dance and Music School in Palenque. He tells me that in the 1980s and ’90s a new generation of young, educated Palenqueros fostered a resurgence in pride in the community’s African roots.

“We defend our values with a shout,” Valdez says. “We are black, and we are defending our culture.”

He believes this pride is essential to combating the racism he says still flourishes on the Colombian coast. His friend, Enrique Marques, agrees, “If you lose your culture, you become a slave again.”

The town’s public school now teaches Palenque’s traditional language to all students."...

****
SHOWCASE VIDEO - BAILE MAPALE, ORIKYTABALA , DE SAN BASILIO DE PALENKE, CARTAGENA COLOMBIA



tradicionyfuzzion, Published on Sep 18, 2008

BAILE MAPALE POR ORIKYTABALA DE SANBASILIO DE PALENKE HERENCIA AFRIKA
-snip-
I think the Spanish to English translation of this sentence is "Mapale Orikytabala dance from San Basilip Palenque, Cartegena, Colombia
-snip-
Here are selected comments from the discussion thread of this video (Numbers are added for referencing purposes only and the English translations are given after all of these comments.)
1. sandrajara28, 2014
"En Colombia estamos orgullosos de nuestras raices africanas e indigenas para todo el que piense que diciendonos negros nos insultas este es el verdadero folclor y la COLOMBIA MESTIZA..QUE VIVA EL AFRICA DENTRO DE COLOMBIA QUE VIVA PALENQUE HPTA "!!!!!!"

**
2. ana rabat, 2015
"Yo soy de África central y tenemos un baile parecido. Qué bueno saber que hay un pedazo de mi África en Colombia."

**
REPLY
3. Nene Loxano Diax, 2015
"+ana rabat Si no estas enterada hay un corregimiento que se llama SAN BACILIO DE PALUENQUE queda en el departamento de Bolívar deberías ir a visitarlo son descendientes de africa."

**
REPLY
4. Billy DeCastro, 2015
"+ana rabat la música del norte y el este del país está influenciada por danzas introducidas a estas regiones por esclavos africanos. que fueron traídos a colombia por europeos, la mezcla de estas con las notas e instrumentos locales formaron un folklor único pero variado en la forma de festejarlo, por largo tiempo fue solo de nuestro suelo, que luego se esparció por toda latino america y las islas del caribe"

**
REPLY ]to question in Spanish "What are the names (of these dances?)"
5. Billy DeCastro, 2016
"To? Guillermo De Castro, bailes. Cumbia y Mapale, en el este en Choco y Buenaventura hay varias danzas que tienen raices africana 

**
6. Cha Ara Gallego, 2016
"Eso es un buen mapalé: Fuerza, energía, sabor, sensualidad; nunca vulgaridad. Maravilloso, San Basilio de Palenque."

**
REPLY
7. Alex Monher, 2016
"HOLA SALUDOS DE MEXICO DESCONOS QUE ES UN MAPALE PODRIAS EXPLICARLO POR FAVOR"

** 
REPLY
8. Cha Ara Gallego, 2016
"Hola, claro. El mapalé es un ritmo y una danza de origen afro y es propio de la costa atlántica colombiana. Se caracteriza, entra varias cosas, por tener movimientos fuertes y sensuales (no vulgares). En esta danza se representan diversos aspectos de la cultura afro que se encuentra en nuestro país. Ente ellas, la imitación del movimiento que hace un pez, al que le llaman mapalé, cuando lo sacan del agua. Esta expresión tuvo su origen hace siglos cundo vivíamos en Colombia la terrible época de la segregación y la esclavitud de la raza negra. Como te digo tiene sus orígenes en las expresiones afros y a ello se suma la mezcla de razas y toda esta cuestión étnica que se dio aquí en la época de la colonia. Actualmente se conservan esta y otras expresiones afros. El video muestra a un grupo de San Basilio de Palenque (el África pequeño, como lo llamamos también), una población cimarrona cerca de Cartagena. San Basilio fue el primer asentamiento de esclavos libres en Colombia. Su lider fue Benkhos Biojó y es para nosotros muy valioso, en todos los aspectos, contar con la vigencia de esta población en la que es como si se hubiese detenido el tiempo en tanto que aún se puede ver la riqueza y belleza de sus arraigadas costumbres y expresiones. Esto es algo muy breve del mapalé. Es muchísimo lo que hay detrás de esta y de las demás danzas afrocolombianas, que son fuerza, sabor, pasión y puro sentimiento; pero aquí te cuento un poco.
Espero haber podido aportar algo en tu haber. Y estás invitadísimo para que vengas y conozcas esta y las otras culturas de nuestro país. Te enamorarás. Yo no soy afrodescendiente, pero me declaro afro y palenquera de corazón, y soy fiel admiradora de esta raza bella, libre y fuerte. Un abrazo caluroso desde Colombia.

**
REPLY
9. Alex Monher, 2016
"GRACIAS POR LA EXPLICACION A ORA ME QUEDA CLARO QUE ES UN MAPALE ES MEJOR PREGUNTAR QUE QUEDARSE CON LA DUDA LA MEJOR EXPLICACION DE UNA PERSONA DE COLOMBIA GRACIAS CLARO QUE ME ENAMORARIA DE COLOMBIA YA QUE EN LA CD DE MEXICO AMAMOS LA MUSICA DE COLOMBIA MUY BUEN SABOR Y RITMO SALUDOS DE MEXICO GRACIAS POR RESPONDER".

**
10. Benishka García, 2017
"Quiero visitar este Palenque. Quiero sentir el repicar de los tambores cerca de mí. Viva mi Madre Patria África."
-snip-
Here are Google translations Spanish to English translations of these comments:
1. sandrajara28, 2014
"In Colombia we are proud of our African and indigenous roots for all who think that telling us blacks insults us this is the real folklore and the COLOMBIA MESTIZA..THE LIVE AFRICA WITHIN COLOMBIA THAT LIVES PALTAQUE HPTA "!!!"

**
2. ana rabat, 2015
"I am from central Africa and we have a similar dance. Good to know there is a piece of my Africa in Colombia."

**
REPLY
3. Nene Loxano Diax, 2015
"+ ana rabat If you are not aware there is a corregimiento that is called SAN BACILIO DE PALUENQUE is in the department of Bolívar you should go to visit him they are descendants of africa."
-snip-
corregimiento = district (location) ?

**
REPLY
4. +Ana Rabat music from the north and east of the country is influenced by dances introduced to these regions by African slaves. that were brought to Colombia by Europeans, the mixture of these with the notes and local instruments formed a unique but varied folk in the way of celebrating it, for a long time it was only from our soil, which later spread throughout Latin America and the islands from the Caribbean

**
REPLY
5. To? Guillermo De Castro, dances. Cumbia and Mapale, in the east in Choco and Buenaventura there are several dances that have African roots
-snip-

**
6. Cha Ara Gallego, 2016
"That's a good mapalé: Strength, energy, taste, sensuality; never vulgarity. Wonderful, San Basilio de Palenque."

**
REPLY
7. Alex Monher, 2016
"HELLO GREETINGS FROM MEXICO WE KNOW THAT IT IS A MAPLE YOU COULD EXPLAIN IT PLEASE."

**
REPLY
8. Cha Ara Gallego, 2016
"Hi, of course. The mapalé is a rhythm and a dance of Afro origin and is typical of the Colombian Atlantic coast. It is characterized, it enters several things, by having strong and sensual movements (not vulgar). In this dance various aspects of Afro culture that is found in our country are represented. Among them, the imitation of the movement made by a fish, which they call mapalé, when they take it out of the water. This expression had its origin centuries ago when we lived in Colombia the terrible era of segregation and slavery of the black race. As I say, it has its origins in Afro expressions and to this is added the mixture of races and all this ethnic question that was given here at the time of the colony. Currently this and other Afro expressions are preserved. The video shows a group of San Basilio de Palenque (small Africa, as we also call it), a maroon population near Cartagena. San Basilio was the first settlement of free slaves in Colombia. Its leader was Benkhos Biojó and it is for us very valuable, in all aspects, to have the validity of this population in which it is as if the time had stopped while you can still see the richness and beauty of its deep-rooted customs and expressions. This is something very brief of the mapalé. There is a lot of what is behind this and the other Afro-Colombian dances, which are strength, taste, passion and pure feeling; but here I tell you a little.
I hope I could contribute something to your credit. And you are very invited to come and know this and the other cultures of our country. You will fall in love I am not an Afro-descendant, but I declare myself afro and a palenquero of heart, and I am a faithful admirer of this beautiful, free and strong race. A warm hug from Colombia."

**
REPLY
9. Alex Monher, 2016
"THANKS FOR THE EXPLANATION TO PRAYER IT IS CLEAR THAT IT IS A MAPLE IT IS BETTER TO ASK THEM TO STAY WITH THE DOUBT THE BEST EXPLANATION OF A PERSON FROM COLOMBIA THANK YOU CLEAR I WOULD LOVE COLOMBIA SINCE ON THE CD OF MEXICO WE LOVE THE MUSIC OF COLOMBIA VERY GOOD FLAVOR AND RITUM GREETINGS FROM MEXICO THANK YOU FOR ANSWERING."

**
10.Benishka García, 2017
"I want to visit this Palenque. I want to feel the drumming of the drums near me. Long live my Motherland Africa."

****
Here are three selected comments from the discussion thread of another copy of this YouTube video: (Comments are numbered for referencing purposes only)
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=AcSdTrS6_Pg arthuroneil, Published on Mar 20, 2011
1. Laura Betancur, 2012
"No, they do not say Palenque, they say "Mapalé", which is the musical rhythm dancing

**
2. Jeanne Suila, 2016
"Sound like the traditional music and dance of the ethnic Kongo people of the 2 Congos and Angola (North Angola)."

**
REPLY
3. Aprende Español, 2017
"Jeanne Suila so interesting, i dont know exactly where were from the slaves that spanish conquer bring to colombia, maybe from Kongo and Angola! For my country these traditions are very special and important, this is part of our history too."

****
Thanks for visiting pancocojams.

Visitor comments are welcome.

Wednesday, January 17, 2018

Klass - Map Marye (Haitian Kompas video with lyrics + English translation)

Edited by Azizi Powell

This pancocojams post showcases a video of the 2016 Haitian Kompas song "Map Marye" by Klass.

Information about this music group is included in this post along with lyrics for this song in Haitian Creole and their English translation.

The content of this post is presented for cultural, entertainment, and aesthetic purposes.
All copyrights remain with their owner.

Thanks to Klass for this song and thanks to all those who quoted in this post. Thanks also to the publisher of this video on YouTube.

****
SHOWCASE VIDEO: KLASS - Map Marye official music video!



kompagrooves, Published on Aug 5, 2016
-snip-
Here's a comment in English from that video's discussion thread:
Oasisfullfilled, 2016
"One thing I can say about Klass they be talking about real subjects that people go through. This is the perfect song to send to your peeps when they triping. Haitians forget what they went through and put that pressure on their kids, they mean well but sometimes they can be overbearing : ) But I love my Haitian Parents and people. Klass it is baby!!!"

****
LYRICS: MAP MARYE

Papi pa di m ou bliye
Mati ou di m ou te pase
Lè ou ak manmanm te fèk rankontre
Se paske w te kenbe jodya m ekziste

[Pre-chorus]
Pouki ou vle pou pitit ou eritye
Mizè ou te andire, se pa sa l ta dwe ye
Se li mwen vle, benediksyon ou konte
Men si w pa aksepte, m ap oblije marye

[Chorus]
M ap marye, oh m ap marye avè l
Li respekte fanmi l, nan li mwen wè lavi m
M ap marye, oh m ap marye avè l
M pa mande pèmisyon, m ap chèche benediksyon

[Verse 2]
Manmi ou di m ou pa vle wè l
Ou di m san w pa ale avè l
Sonje se mwen ki pral viv avèl
Li fè lavi m pi bèl ohh

[Pre-chorus]
Pouki ou vle pou pitit ou eritye
Mizè ou te andire, se pa sa l ta dwe ye
Se li mwen vle, benediksyon ou konte
Men si w pa aksepte, m ap oblije marye

[Chorus]
M ap marye, oh m ap marye avè l
Li respekte fanmi l, nan li mwen wè lavi m
M ap marye, oh m ap marye avè l
M pa mande pèmisyon, m ap chèche benediksyon

[Guitar solo]
Woy, woy konpa
Pipo tout jan tout tan
Woy, woy
Wouch, oh letènèl
Lalalalalala
Eske nelson patisserie plòtonnen

Mamni tande – ya oh
Sa se pitit ou kap pale – ya ya oh
Mwen toujou fè sa w vle men fwa sa ou dwe sipòte m – ya ya oh
Papi tanpri – ya oh
M konnen w pa ta vle m soufri – ya ya oh
Men ou pa ka fè santiman m, se li menm ki tout kè kontan m

Manmi ou se tèt chapo mwen ba ou, fò w mete l
Nou pa ka chwazi pou mwen, je suis plus un garmin
Papi ou se tèt chapo mwen ba ou, fò w mete l
Nou toulède gradye profesyonèl nou ye

Cheri pa enkyete w, m gen kontwòl tout bagay
K L A S S, klass
Konpa, konpa
Sa son w brezo
Woy woy, yo mele
Yaya fly
Woy woy, yo mele
Klass it is baby, yes it is baby
Moskino
Bon nou pral bay on ti apèsu sou bal la wi, tande sa

Gen sa k gen tèt ki pa gen kò
Gen sa k gen kò ki pa gen tèt
Nou menm djaz sa nou gen tèt nou gen kò, depose konpa

Se se se, ay, men konpa

Manmi ou se tèt chapo mwen ba ou, fò w mete l
Si nou konnen nou byen eduke m, pouki nou gen dout sou chwa m ap fè
Papi ou se tèt chapo mwen ba ou, fò w mete l

*** Source : wikimizik***
From https://www.konpaevents.com/new-song-lyrics-sing-with-klass-map-marye-lyrics/

****
-snip-
Google translation from Haitian Creole to English:

Papi does not tell me you forgot
Mathew told me you had passed
When you and your mother have just met
It's because you've kept me jody

[Pre-chorus]
Why do you want your children to inherit?
The affair you endured is not what it should be
I want it, your blessing is counted
But if you do not accept, I'll have to get married

[Chorus]
I'm getting married, oh marrying
She respects her family, in her I see my life
I'm getting married, oh marrying
I do not ask permission, I look for blessings

[Verse 2]
Your mommy tells me you do not want to see her
You tell me without going with her
Remember that I am going to live
It makes my life more beautiful ohh

[Pre-chorus]
Why do you want your children to inherit?
The affair you endured is not what it should be
I want it, your blessing is counted
But if you do not accept, I'll have to get married

[Chorus]
I'm getting married, oh marrying
She respects her family, in her I see my life
I'm getting married, oh marrying
I do not ask permission, I look for blessings

[Guitar solo]
Woy, woy compass
Pipo all the way
Woy, woy
Wear, oh let's go
Lalalalalala
Is Nelson patisserie plungned

Mamni heard - ya oh
This is your baby - oh ya
I always do what you want but the time you have to support me - oh ya
Papi please - ya oh
I know you do not want me to suffer - ya oh
But you can not make my feelings, it's all my joy

Your mommy is the head of my hat, give it to you
You can not choose for me, I'm still garmin
Your pope is the head of my hat, give it to you
We are both professional graduates

Cheri does not worry, I have control of everything
K L A S S, class
Compass, compass
That sounds wild
Woy yawn, they are confused
Yaya fly
Woy yawn, they are confused
Class it is baby, yes it is baby
Moskino
Well, we'll give a little insight into the bullet, yes

There are those who do not have bodies
There is no body that has no head
We ourselves have our bodies, our compassions

It is, ay, but compass

Your mommy is the head of my hat, give it to you
If you know me well, why do you have doubts about my choices?
Your pope is the head of my hat, give it to you
-snip-
Additions and corrections for these lyrics are welcome.

****
INFORMATION ABOUT KLASS
From http://kompamagazine.com/kompaboard/viewtopic.php?f=2&t=422 KLASS AND THE HAITIAN MUSIC INDUSTRY aka (HMI)?
..."In the entertainment industry, especially music, groups are formed and disbanded afterward for different reasons and that’s how KLASS got into the game on April 18, 2012 with their members as follows:

• Maestro & drummer, Jean Herard Richard aka Richie aka Hitmaker/Superstar maker.
• Lead vocal: Edersse Stanis: aka Pipo, The prophet/The voice.
• Lead guitar: Romny Floristal aka El Pozo the Assassin.
• Bass guitar: Nixon Mesidor aka Sexy Nicky.
• Rhythm Guitar: Kevin Gaippe aka BelKod.
• Percussions: Wid Pierre aka Carlo Cheveux.
• Keyboard: Jean Pierre Francisque aka JP.
• Congas: Sorel Sanon aka Soso Brezo.
• Saxophone: Abdel LaFrance aka Taxman
• Trumpet: Nathan Seth Merlin
• Sound engineer: Lavaud Georges
• Logistic: Serge Enel Jean-Louis aka Sergo.
• Manager: Herve Bastien aka Manager the Best

Today, before KLASS became the envy of the HMI due to their sudden success, Jean Herard Richard the proud founder of the band along with Romny Floristal, Nixon Mesidor Herve Bastien then later on Edersse Stanis, went through stages in his musical career. Jean Herard Richard was born in Port-au-Prince, Haiti in October that makes him a Libra. He grew up in the North of Haiti, Cap Haitian where he attended school. He went from bands to bands like Power-X, 2nd Fashion then made his way to the United States in 1992 where he attended college at BCC in Miami, Florida. Then, he joined Tah-Pajj until 1996. Richie left that group to join Zenglen from 1997 to 2011. At that point, he realized that stability is essential in order to secure a viable future in this shaky industry for himself and his band mates. That’s how the magical group KLASS was born in the HMI on April 18, 2012.

At first, when KLASS released their first single “Bagay Neuf” in early 2012 with a different lead singer, the song was a very hot song but not good enough to create the buzz that the Hitmaker, the superstar maker is known for. So sensibly, Richie closed shop and went back to the studio for months with other Klassmates to create new hit songs like “Priorite, You don’t want me” etc. None of this would have been possible without the Prophet, Pipo, the commanding voice of Konpa Direk of today. Note that Pipo wasn’t part of the group initially. He later joined KLASS after his departure from another reputable group known to most in the HMI. The rest is history in the making since the release of their first CD in 2013. That album sets the bar so high that Klass becomes without any doubt the number one band in the industry and to this date they are still packing clubs wherever they are performing."...

****
From http://www.elinefleury.com/single-post/2016/1/25/Klass-Best-Haitian-Entertainer-of-the-Year
Klass " Best Haitian Entertainer of the Year"
January 25, 2016 by Kate Menard
"Since its inception, just under four years ago, Konpa band KLASS has seen quick and tremendous success. This past October, at the 34th Annual International Reggae & World Music Awards, KLASS took home "Best Haitian Entertainer of the Year". Despite its accolades and fame, however, it is apparent that the band remains grounded, dedicated to its music, and dedicated to its fans."

****
Thanks for visiting pancocojams.

Visitor comments are welcome.

Monday, January 15, 2018

Distinctive Names That Are Used By Some African Americans & By Some Mormons

Eited by Azizi Powell

Revised January 18, 2018

This pancocojams post presents some examples of distinctive Mormon names that are the same as or very similar to some contemporary (1960s to date) distinctive African American names.

A quote about a famous African American with that name is given after some of these selected names. I've also added other brief notes about some of these selected names.

This post is part of pancocojams' ongoing series on distinctive names and nicknames.

The content of this post is presented for etymological and cultural purposes.

All copyrights remain with their owners.

Thanks to all those who are quoted in this post.

****
DISCLAIMER
This post indicates that African Americans and Mormons are two populations in the United States that sometimes give their children distinctive personal names. And some of the distinctive names that these two populations give their children are the same or are quite similar.

However, this post doesn't mean to imply that most African American names are distinctive. On the contrary, documentation has shown that most African American given names at birth are the same as the names given to the general population in the United States*, although the popularity of those standard names appears to vary by race in any given year. It's likely that most Mormon children also have personal names that are "standard" in the United States, although the popularity of those names among Mormons may be different than their popularity among Americans in general.

*For example, click http://www1.nyc.gov/site/doh/about/press/pr2017/pr098-17.page http://www1.nyc.gov/site/doh/about/press/pr2017/pr098-17.page for a list of girls' names and boys' names by race for babies born in 2016 in New York City.

**
I don't consider myself to be an expert on African American naming practices. However, I am African American and I have been informally studying African American naming practices and I have been collecting examples of distinctive African American names for more than twenty years.

In contrast, my only knowledge of Mormon names and Mormon naming practices is what I've read online.

This isn't meant to be a comprehensive list of the distinctive given names that African American and Mormon share.

There are other, largely no longer given "older names" in those Mormon lists that some African Americans had prior to the 1960s. However, I've not added names from that category onto this "shared names" list that is found below.

This list also doesn't include examples of what I consider to be "different", "trendy" names from these online sources that are now popular in the general American population including African Americans. "Brookelyn", a variant spelling of "Brooklyn" is an example of that category of different names.

I'm aware that other people might arrive at a different list of "shared" African American & Mormon names than the one that I've given below.

Additions and corrections to this shared list of names are welcome.

****
PANCOCOJAMS EDITOR'S NOTE
This list of names consists of selected names from a website entitled "1,500,000 baby names MALE Mormon baby names" and its companion webpage "1,500,000 baby names FEMALE Mormon baby names" (hyperlinks given below).

For the purpose of this post, I've selected those Mormon names that I (as an African American and as a collector of contemporary African American names) have directly known, read of, or heard. These contemporary distinctive names that I've showcased below are either exactly the same as those that have been given to or are still given to African Americans, or they are reworkings (different spellings, and other variant forms) of these names. Rightly or wrongly, most of these names are often referred to as "Black names".

As to how Mormons may have become familiar with these names, firstly, some Mormons are Black and therefore may know these names. Secondly, my position is that Mormons who give their children distinctive names are alert to possible names from the mass media (particularly television, movies, and the internet) and/or from their direct interaction with African Americans and other people who aren't Mormons.

From my reading about Mormon naming practices, it appears to me that African Americans and Mormons use some of the same or similar strategies to create distinctive names. For example, some names are created by combining two already existing names, non-standard spelling is frequently used to create uniqueness, a prefix and/or suffix is (are) used to create unique names, some names include an apostrophe, and some names are hyphenated. Furthermore, some distinctive African American names and Mormon names use nouns as names (such as virtue words, time of birth words, names of seasons, and status nouns).

That said, these two populations appear to use different sets of "nouns as names" - which leads me to this larger point: Many Mormon names are different from African American names because the "pool of names" that is used (and available to be used) by Mormons is considerably different from African Americans' pool of names. For example, a number of contemporary (1960 on) distinctive names that some African Americans use are Arabic names or are variant forms of Arabic names. Also, from the 1960s on some African Americans have given our children names, clips, of names, or names re-purposed from nouns from certain traditional African languages (particularly Swahili, Akan, and Zulu). Three examples of names from these three traditional African languages are the Swahili word "nia" (pronounced KNEE-ah) used as a female name, the Akan male day name "Kwame" (pronounced KWAH-me"), the Yoruba name element/nickname "tunde" pronounced TOON-day) used as a male name, and the Zulu male name "Shaka" (pronounced SHAH-ka) and also given as "Chaka" among African Americans.

In contrast, according to http://www.momjunction.com/articles/mormon-baby-names-for-girls-and-boys_00424377/#gref 50 Latest Mormon Baby Names For Boys And Girls With Meanings
"Mormons, the members of the church residing in Utah, US, have a mantra, “in the world, but not of the world”, which they apply to everything, including the way they name their children. They pick standard names but tweak the spelling a bit to make it exclusive to them. However, not every Mormon parent likes invented or combination names for their children. Some choose Biblical names or names derived from the stories or chapters of the Book of Mormon, a religious text of the Latter Day Saints."...
-snip-
That same website author wrote about "the passion for ‘y’ in girl names among the Mormons" and gave some examples of female "y" names including "Jossilyn", "Madelyn", and "Payslee".

Another website on Mormon names https://nameberry.com/blog/mormon-baby-names-traditions-and-trends Mormon Baby Names: Traditions and trends (Posted January 11th, 2015) indicates that "Even among Utah baby names, though, there are trends. Boys’ names lean heavily towards two syllable names ending with –er, –en and –ton. While mainstream names like Jayden remain popular, it’s really better to pick something a little more unusual. Truxton perhaps? Decken, Nyler, Kyson, Teyton, Zyker, and Trusen have all been chosen for babies recently.

Girls’ names almost always have a letter y in them somewhere. Mormons love the letter y. Which explains the popularity of names that end with –ley (or more commonly –lee or –leigh), and names that end with –lyn: Kyzlee, Oaklyn, Tynslee, McCartlyn, Avonlie, Chandley, Skylynne. and Chasidee."...
-snip-
One of my conclusion from these excerpts is that Mormon "sound preferences" are different from African American sound preferences. I believe that a few examples of African American sound preferences are "sha/cha" prefixes and/or suffixes (as in the name "Shante"), the "aun"/"on" and "La" prefix as in the name "LaShaun" ("Lashon", "Lashawn"), and the "isha" suffix as in the name "Keisha"). Note: These names are mostly given to females, but, with the exception of "Keisha" might also be given to males. Also, these names all have numerous forms created by respellings, adding apostrophes, capitalizing the first letter of the second syllable, or adding a prefix or a suffix.

****
SELECTED DISTINCTIVE MORMON NAMES AND DISTINCTIVE AFRICAN AMERICAN NAMES [SHARED MALE NAMES]
Pancocojams Editor's Note: I've included comments about some of these names after the name itself.

EXCERPT #1:
List of Mormon names from http://www.just-think-it.com/sbn/mormon-m.htm "1,500,000 baby names MALE Mormon baby names"

A, B
C, D
Cordell
D'Monte
Daquan
-snip-
Among African Americans, this name is usually pronounced "DAY-quan".
-snip-
Darnell
Delmar
Deontre'
-snip-
Among African Americans, this name is spelled "Deondre" without the apostrophe at the end. It is also spelled "DeAndre" and "Deaundray" among other spellings.

Deron
-snip-
Among African Americans, this name has various other spellings, including capitalizing the "r". Often a suffix is added such as "Deronte (usually pronounced "day-RON-tay)
-snip-
DeShawn
-snip-
This contemporary male name is very popular among certain populations of African Americans. It is usually pronounced "Day-shawn". Instead of Deshawn, the prefix could be "Da" (pronounced "day") and, like other De/day names, its nickname is often "Day Day"). The "shawn" element is spelled "shon", "shaun", or "sean". This name could also have an added suffix (such as "te"/"tay" or "dre"/"dray".

One female form of this name among African Americans is "Deshawna".
-snip-
Devon
-snip-
Among African Americans, in the name "Devon" usually has a suffix (same as DeShawn), but I believe that the "De" in Devonte (for example) is usually pronounced "dah") and not "day". An African American spelling of this name is "DeVante". A famous example: "DeVante Swing" - member of the American R&B quartet with brothers DeVante Swing, Mr. Dalvin, K-Ci, and JoJo https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Jodeci
-snip-
DeWayne
-snip-
This name is also spelled "Dwayne" among African Americans. A famous example of an African American with this name is Dwyane Tyrone Wade Jr., born January 17, 1982) is an American professional basketball player for the Cleveland Cavaliers of the National Basketball Association (NBA). https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Dwyane_Wade

E, F
G, H
I, J
Jacari
-snip-
Among African Americans, I believe that this male name is usually spelled "Jaquari" (pronunciation: jah-KAH-ree or jah-CAR-ree). An "African American" variant form of this male name is "Jaquarius".
Jaden
Jadon
K, L
Kenrick
LaMar
Larnell
-snip-
This name serves as an example of the frequent use of the "ell" suffix in Mormon male (and female) names and in African American male (and female) names.
-snip-
LaVar
LeVar
-snip-
Levardis Robert Martyn "LeVar" Burton Jr. (born February 16, 1957) is an American actor, presenter, director and author. He is best known for his roles as the host of the long-running PBS children's series Reading Rainbow, Lt. Commander Geordi La Forge in Star Trek: The Next Generation and the young Kunta Kinte in the 1977 award-winning ABC television miniseries Roots". https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/LeVar_Burton
-snip-

M, N
Mondell
Among African Americans, this name is usually given as "Montell".
"Montell Du'Sean Barnett (born December 3, 1968), known professionally as Montell Jordan, is an American singer, songwriter and record producer, best known for his 1995 single "This Is How We Do It"." https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Montell_Jordan
-snip-
Notice the middle name Du'Sean which is a rare example of a distinctive African American apostrophe name that includes the widely used "Sean" ("Shawn", "Shon", "Shaun") name.
-snip-
Montel Brian Anthony Williams (born July 3, 1956) is an American television personality, radio talk show host, and actor. He is best known as host of the long-running The Montel Williams Show"...https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Montel_Williams.

O, P
Odell
Q, R
S, T
Shay
-snip-
Among African American, this is usually a female nickname, often doubled ("Shay Shay")
Shon
-snip-
Among African Americans, "Shon" may be most often spelled "Shaun" or (when spelled various ways) is an element that is part of longer male or female names.
-snip-
Tevyn
-snip-
This name serves as an example of the Mormon custom of substituting a "y" for the letter "i" in names. Among African Americans, "Tevyn" is usually spelled "Tevin".
"Tevin Jermod Campbell (born November 12, 1976) is an American singer, songwriter and actor." https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tevin_Campbell
-snip-
Tevin Ford Coleman (born April 16, 1993) is an American football running back for the Atlanta Falcons of the National Football League (NFL). https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tevin_Coleman
-snip-
Trace-Denzel
-snip-
I added the name "Trace-Denzel" to give an example of a Mormon hyphenated name.
-snip-
"Denzel Hayes Washington Jr. (born December 28, 1954)[1] is an American actor, director, and producer. He has received three Golden Globe awards, a Tony Award,[2] and two Academy Awards: Best Supporting Actor for the historical war drama film Glory (1989) and Best Actor for his role as a corrupt cop in the crime thriller Training Day (2001)" https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Denzel_Washington
-snip-
Travon
-snip-
"Trayvon" is another spelling of this name among African Americans. A famous example of this name is Trayvon Martin (February 5, 1995 – February 26, 2012), a 17-year-old African American from Miami Gardens, Florida, who was fatally shot in Sanford, Florida by George Zimmerman, a neighborhood watch volunteer. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Trayvon_Martin
-snip-
U, V
W, X
Y, Z

****
SELECTED DISTINCTIVE MORMON NAMES AND DISTINCTIVE CONTEMPORARY AFRICAN AMERICAN NAMES [SHARED FEMALE NAMES]
Excerpt #2: From http://www.just-think-it.com/sbn/mormon-f.htm http://www.just-think-it.com/sbn/mormon-f.htm "1,500,000 baby names FEMALE Mormon baby names"

A, B
Alena
Aleta
Alina
Alinda
Almira
Anniyah
Ardell
Ardella
Arletta
Arminta
Askia
-snip-
"Askia" is a male African name for a famous historical figure https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Askia_Mohammad_I. I've no direct experience with it being used as a female or male name, but a Google search resulted in the male name Askia Booker (a Black male basketball player) https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Askia_Booker
-snip-
Azi
-snip-
This is one of the nicknames that people have used for my (female) Kiswahili originated name "Azizi". I've been told that the Arabic form of this name "Aziza" is the most often used female form of the male name "Aziz".

C, D
Chandra
Chanice
-snip-
Among African Americans, the name "Chanice" may be spelled "Shanice", and is an example of the frequent us of "Sha" and "Cha" prefixes in African American names. Those prefixes are also found, but not as frequently, in Mormon names.
-snip-
Shanice Lorraine Wilson[1] (born May 14, 1973), better known simply as Shanice, is an American singer–songwriter, actress and dancer. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Shanice
-snip-
The suffix "ice" (pronounced "ees") is found many more African American names than Mormon names. The African American names with the suffix "ice" are usually female, but one common example is the male name "Maurice".
-snip-
Channa
Channelle
Chantell
Charis
-snip-
Among African Americans, this name is given as "Karis".
-snip-
Cherysa
-snip-
The name "Cherise" that is relatively common among African Americans. This name is similar to the name "Cherysa" that is found in this Mormon name list. The substitution of a "y" for an "i" appears to be a commonly spelling practice among some Mormons according to several online articles including https://nameberry.com/blog/mormon-baby-names-traditions-and-trends "Mormon Baby Names: Traditions and trends" quote: "Girls’ names almost always have a letter y in them somewhere. Mormons love the letter y. Which explains the popularity of names that end with –ley (or more commonly –lee or –leigh), and names that end with –lyn"...
-snip-
Chiara
-snip-
"Ciara" is another spelling of this name. "Ciara Princess Harris (born October 25, 1985),[1] known mononymously as Ciara ... is an American singer, songwriter, record producer, dancer, model and actress. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ciara
-snip-

Chenille
Claudean
-snip-
"Claudine is a 1974 American comedy-drama, romantic film, produced by Third World Films and distributed by 20th Century Fox... it is noted for being one of the few mainstream films featuring an African-American cast released during that time which was not a blaxploitation film." https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Claudine_(film)
-snip-
DaNeen
-snip-
Among African Americans, this name is also spelled "Deneen" and pronounced dah-NEEN.
-snip-
Danetta
Danica
-snip-
The "ica" suffix is often given as "ika" in contemporary "African American" names.
-snip-
Dannika
Dawnica
-snip-
Judging from the lists of Mormon names that I've read, "Dawn" is a popular name element among some Mormon, similar to the popularity of the name element "Shawn" (and its variant spellings "Shon", "Shaun" and "Sean" among some African Americans.
-snip-
Deja
-snip-
Deja was the name of the fictional character that Tyra Banks played in the 1995 movie Higher Learning. According to http://www.thinkbabynames.com/meaning/0/Deja : "Deja entered the list in 1980-1989 and reached its peak position of #182 in the U.S. in the year 1996, and is presently at #1947. (2016 BIRTH STATISTICS)"
-snip-
Deneen
-snip-
I know an African American woman name "Deneen" who was born in the 1970s.
Deneil
Denica
DeShaune
-snip-
This name is very similar to the multiple African American names (both male and female) which include the element "Shaun" or another spelling of that name. Female names with this element may end with "a" (i.e. DeShauna". The "de" prefix in those names is usually pronounced "day".
-snip-
Desta
-snip-
The name "Desta" is found on online list of Ethiopian female names, with the meaning "happiness". http://www.top-100-baby-names-search.com/ethiopian-baby-names.html. I know one African American woman with this name.
-snip-
Destany
-snip-
The female name "Destiny" is relatively common among African Americans.
-snip-
DeVonte
-snip-
Among African Americans, this name is usually given to males. (Read the name list for males that is found above.)
-snip-
Dorenda
Donetta
E, F
Felisa
-snip-
Among African Americans, this name is usually spelled "Felicia". This name has been popularized by the saying "Bye Felicia".

An uncommon African American spelling of this name is Phylicia Rashād ...(June 19, 1948) is an American actress, singer and stage director. She is known for her role as Clair Huxtable on the long-running NBC sitcom The Cosby Show (1984–92), which earned her Emmy Award nominations in 1985 and 1986." https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Phylicia_Rashad
-snip-
Florice
Heaven-Lee
Heavenly-Melanie
-snip-
The name "Heaven" and "Heavenly" are found among African Americans. I added these example of Mormon names to document the use of hyphenated names are among Mormons. I'm not aware if these names are hyphenated among African Americans.
-snip-
G, H
I, J
Imari
-snip-
The name "Imari" is similar in spelling and pronunciation to the name "Amari". African Americans have used the name Amari as male and female name. "Amari" is said to be of Swahili origin, but it could have been coined by African Americans from the male name "Amiri" (meaning "prince").

"Amari Cooper (born June 17, 1994) is an American football wide receiver for the Oakland Raiders of the National Football League. He played college football at the University of Alabama where he was the Biletnikoff Award winner as the nation's top receiver and a unanimous All-American in 2014. Widely considered the top wide receiver prospect of the 2015 NFL Draft, he was selected with the fourth overall pick by the Raiders." https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Amari_Cooper.
-snip-
Isha
"Isha" is a female name and also a very widely used contemporary (African American) suffix. "Aisha" (usually pronounced "I-EE-sha" (and sometimes spelled "Iesha") is the most frequently found "isha" name among African Americans.

Here's some information about the Arabic word "isha":
"The Isha prayer (Arabic: صلاة العشاء‎ ṣalāt al-ʿišāʾ... "night prayer") is the night-time daily prayer recited by practising Muslims. It is the fifth of the five daily prayers– (salat) [Islamic evening begins at maghrib]."... https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Isha_prayer
-snip-
Among African Americans, the name "Isha" may be considered a clip of the now relatively widely known Arabic name "Aisha" ("Ayisha", "Ayesha, "Iesha" etc.). "Iesha" is the title of a 1990 hit R&B record about a girl with that name. The song was recorded by the African American young boys group "Another Bad Creation (ABC)".
-snip-
Janielle
Among African Americans, this name is also spelled "Janelle" and may be best known because of the singer Janelle Monae.

"Janelle Monáe Robinson...born December 1, 1985)[10] is an American recording artist, record producer, actress and model"... K, Lhttps://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Janelle_Mon%C3%A1e
-snip-
Javan
-snip-
Among African Americans, the name "Javan" is usually given as "Javon". "Javon" is usually considered a male name.
-snip-
Jayla
"Jayla" is a frequently found contemporary name among African Americans.
Jelisa
Jelissa
Jenica
Jennica
Jinaya
-snip-
Among African Americans, the female name "Jinaya" is usually spelled "Jeniya". This contemporary name is widely found among African Americans.
-snip-
Jontay
-snip-
Among African Americans "Jontay" ("Jonte") is a male or female name. This name may have been coined by African Americans by rhyming the male name "Donte".
-snip-
K, L
Kieri
Kieron
Kiersha
Kirsha
Kishia
-snip-
The three names "Kiersha", "Kirsha", and "Kishia" are similar in spelling to the very frequently used contemporary African American name "Keisha" (found with multiple spellings). I believe that this name became so popular among African Americans as a result of this actress: "Keshia Knight Pulliam (born April 9, 1979)[2] is an American actress. She is known for her childhood role as Rudy Huxtable, the youngest child of Cliff and Clair Huxtable at just the age of 5 to 13, on the NBC sitcom The Cosby Show (1984–92)...https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Keshia_Knight_Pulliam.
-snip-
Lachelle
LaTisha
-snip-
In my experience, the name "LaTisha" is usually pronounced lah-TIS-sha (with "tis" rhyming with the English word "wish".)
Read the note about the name "Tisha" below.
-snip-
LaShawna
Lavonda
-snip-
There are other "La" names in this list of Mormon female names. While I recognize other names on this list as ones that African Americans have, those names that I recognize appear to me to predate the late 1960s (names such as LaRinda, Lorinda, (among African Americans "Larenda"), "LaRue", "LaQuita", Latrina, and "Lavada" (pronounced lah-VEY-dah), LaVonne (LaVaughn) are names of females who I've known who are in their fifties and sixties. A famous example of the name "LaVaughn" among African Americans is "Michelle LaVaughn Robinson Obama (born January 17, 1964) is an American lawyer and writer who was First Lady of the United States from 2009 to 2017. She is married to the 44th President of the United States, Barack Obama, and is the first African-American First Lady. Raised on the South Side of Chicago".https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Michelle_Obama.
-snip-
M, N
M'Kayla
Macayla
McKayla
-snip-
The female name "Makayla" (pronounced mah-KAY-lah) is frequently found among African Americans.
-snip-
Malia
Malia (pronunciation mah-LEE-ah) is the oldest daughter of President Barack Obama and Michelle Obama. Her younger sister is named Natasha (Sasha). http://csipresident.wikia.com/wiki/Malia_Obama.
-snip-
Niecee
Among African American "Neecy" is a nickname for the name "Denise".
-snip-
O, P
Q, R
Rhiana
Among Americans and others, this name is most widely associated with the singer "Rihanna".
"Robyn Rihanna Fenty ... February 20, 1988) is a Barbadian singer, songwriter, and actress." https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Rihanna
-snip-
S, T
Risha
-snip-
This is a rare example of an "isha" (pronounced "eesha") suffix Arabic name that is found among African Americans.
-snip-
Shahara
-snip-
This name is usually given as "Sahara" among African Americans.
Shamaine
Shamaya
Shanel
-snip-
This name is usually given as "Chanel" among African Americans.
-snip-
Shanisha
Shantay
-snip-
"Shontae" ("Shonte", "Shauntay" etc) are very frequently found contemporary African American female names.
Shantel
Shantell
Shantelle
Shawntae
Shayla-rynne
Among African Americans, the name "Shayla" is found without the other hyphenated name.
-snip-
Taleah
Taleesha
Talesha
-snip-
"Talesha" is an example of "eesha" suffix names that are relatively common among post 1960s African American female names.
-snip-
Tamecia
-snip-
Among African Americans, "Tamecia" is given as "Tamika".
"Tamika" is pronounced tah-ME-kah. I agree with the following commenter that African Americans in the early 1960s coined the "Tamika" was coined by African from the Japanese as a form of the name "Tamiko":
"It is unlikely that Tamika has anything to do with "tamu"*. It is more likely just an African-American variation of Tamiko. If you check the SSA data you will see that in 1968, the first year both Tamiko and Tamika are among the top 1000, there were more Tamikos born than Tamikas. The name was probably introduced to the United States by the 1963 film _A Girl Named Tamiko_. This film, though about a Japanese woman falling in love with a White American man, was in many ways an anti-racism story. This appealed to African-Americans back in the 1960s, and some of them who saw the movie named daughters Tamiko because of it. The very title of the film of course would encourage this. In American accents, though, Tamiko easily can be mistaken for "Tamika", and since -a is a much more common ending for feminine names in English than -o is, African-American parents who heard the name outside of its film context assumed that "Tamika" was how it should be spelled.
― clevelandkentevans 7/5/2005"
*"Tamu" (mentioned in that comment) was a Swahili female name that was popularized in the early 1970s http://myauctionfinds.com/2012/11/02/readers-ask-about-tamu-and-terri-lee-dolls/.

I believe that the name "Tamu" didn't "take" among African Americans because we don't like the beginning or ending sound of the letter "u".
-snip-
Tanisha
-snip-
The name "Tanisha" (usually pronounced tah-NIS-sha) has several known origins. One origin that's sometimes cited among African Americans is that "Tanisha" means "girl born on Monday" in Hausa. However, that etymology isn't correct. In the Hausa language, "Litinin" is the Hausa word for the English word "Monday". https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=onNnOZL-gqY Days of the Week in Hausa by Learn Hausa with Nadiya Garba, Published on Sep 12, 2016
-snip-
The name "Tanisha" may have been created by combining the beginning of the name "Tanya" with the familiar suffix "isha". Or, I believe less likely, the name "Tanisha" is a variant form of the name of the North Africa nation of "Tunisia".

Although it probably isn't related to how African American coined the name "Tanisha", I recently learned that the Yoruba (Nigeria) element "Tani" means "Who is like?". Two examples of Yoruba names with the element "Tani" are "Tanitoluwa" (Who is like unto God?) and "Tanitoluwami" (Who is like my God?)
https://maternitynest.com/yoruba-names-girls/
-snip-
Tenika
-snip-
"Teneka" ("Tenieka") is a form of the relatively widely found post 1960s African American name "Tamika".
-snip-
Tiana
The name "Tiana" (pronounced tee-AH-nah) is best known because it is the name of the first Black princess in the Disney franchise.
"Tiana is a fictional main character who appears in Walt Disney Pictures' 49th animated feature film The Princess and the Frog (2009). Created by directors Ron Clements and John Musker and animated by Mark Henn, Tiana is voiced by Anika Noni Rose as an adult, while Elizabeth M. Dampier voices the character as a child. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tiana_(Disney)
-snip-
Tisha
-snip-
The name Tisha is best known because of African American actress Tisha Campbell-Martin https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tisha_Campbell-Martin is probably best known as the lead actress in the television sicom Martin. Tisha Campbell-Martin pronounces her name "TEE-sha".

The female name "Teesha" is probably related to this name.
-snip-
Toshia
-snip-
This name is given as "Tasha", "Tosha" among African Americans.
-snip-
U, V
Venetia
Venita
Vonda
W, X
Y, Z
Zion
Among African Americans, the name "Zion" is given relatively frequently to females or males. I have of often seen the name "Zion" paired with the name "Zaire" (zi-AIR) as a twin name, in keeping with the African American custom of giving twins names that begin with the same letter of the alphabet.

****
Thanks for visiting pancocojams.

Visitor comments are welcome.