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Friday, August 18, 2017

Five Videos Of Malian (West Africa) Performer Thialé Arby

Edited by Azizi Powell

This pancocojams post showcase five videos of Malian singer .

In addition to the singing and music, these videos are also presented to showcase the traditional clothing and hairstyles of the performers and their audiences.

The content of this post is presented for cultural, entertainment, and aesthetic purposes.

All copyrights remain with their owners.

Thanks to Thialé Arby for his musical legacy. Thanks to all those who are quoted in this post and thanks also to Syllart26, the publisher of these videos on YouTube.

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SHOWCASE VIDEOS
These videos are presented in chronological order with the video with the oldest publishing date given first.

Example #1: Thialé Arby Top Etoile 2014 (Musique Malienne)


Syllart26 LIVE Mali Published on Jan 26, 2016

By Syllart26 LIVE Mali Musique

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Example #2: Thialé Harby Aye Bine Bakoye Top Etoile 2015 Mama Toumani Kone (Musique Malienne)



Syllart26 LIVE Mali, Published on Jan 26, 2016

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Example #3: Thialé ARBY - Dibalo LIVE Madina Coura BKO 2016



Syllart26 LIVE Mali, Published on Nov 20, 2016

By Syllart26 LIVE Mali Musique

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Example #4: Thialé Arby - Dibolo LIVE Special Police Malienne 2017



Syllart26 LIVE Mali, Published on Apr 23, 2017

By Syllart26 LIVE Mali Musique

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Example #5: Thialé Arby - Diarabi LIVE Segou Mali 2017



Syllart26 LIVE Mali Published on May 8, 2017

by Syllart26 Live

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Seven Videos Of Takamba Music & Dance From Mali, West Africa

Edited by Azizi Powell

This pancocojams post provides information about the "Takamba" music and dance genre from Mali, West Africa.

The content of this post is presented for cultural, entertainment, and aesthetic purposes.

All copyrights remain with their owners.

Thanks to all groups that are showcased in this post and thanks to all those who are quoted in this post. Thanks also to the publishers of these examples on YouTube.

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INFORMATION ABOUT TAKAMBA MUSIC AND DANCE
From http://www.cp-africa.com/2016/02/05/mali-the-passage-of-takamba-music/ "Mali:The Passage Of Takamba Music" by Max Ndianaefo
"Takamba music and dance originated from the Songhai Empire in the 15th century. with Gao as its capital and commercial center. Before being known as Takamba, it was performed by Tamashesq griots and blacksmiths of the Gao region to celebrate the end of harvest and to welcome and encourage warriors back from battle, and to praise noble families. The griot, in a sitting position, would play the terhardent, also known as the kurbu by the Songhai people or more commonly [known as] ngoni. Takamba has gradually evolved through contact with Songhai populations enriching the cultural lives of noble people living in the Tameshesq camps. The settlement of the Tameshesq population in a mixed neighborhood led to a cultural fusion, the music of which, Takamba, was one form of expression.

The word, Takamba, has its origin in the village of Temera, situated between Timbuktu and Gourem. People of that region spoke of a Tamashesq master and his griot who were camping one day near Temera. When hearing the sound of a terhardent, the Songhai villagers approached the two men. Fascinated by the beauty of one of the women, the master wanted to lend her his hand. His griot spoke to the woman, saying "takamba", "take the hand". This is how the term "takamba" was born in Terema, a village renamed after the music. Another version tells the story of Mahamana Zaou Sadio, a Sonhai who invited a Tamasheq griot to his village to celebrate his daughter's wedding. Seduced by the languorous music, the Songhai began to solicit Tamashesq griots to woo women.

Until the 1960s, Takamba was sung and only accompanied by the terhardent, joined sporadically by hand clapping as percussion. Dancing was subtle and performed while seated. Takamba spread from village to village to evolve into festive music during Songhai social and religious gatherings. For both men and women, it offered an opportunity to engage in subtle gestures that were forbidden in everyday life.
-snip-
This article continues with information about contemporary Takamba.

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From the discussion thread for Super Onze, Future Takamba video https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=sUK5Ko7j2ck, given as #2 below]
alhadji innou Safiou, 2017
"la signification de takamba veut dire en langue songhoi :prenez:ta où la , kamba veut dire la main en langue songhoi d'où takamba veut prendre sa main pour danser.cela ne provient pas des touaregs.le mot est songhoi.je vous en prie il faut dire la vérité aux blancs."
-snip-
Google translated from French to English
"The meaning of takamba means in the language songhoi: take: ta where the, kamba means the hand in tongue songhoi from where takamba wants to take his hand to dance. This does not come from the Tuaregs. The word is songhoi.je you in Pray, we must tell the truth to the whites."

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From http://www.travelomali.com/activities/songhai-dance,-the-takamba/#.WYuIX1GGPcs
"Songhai Dance: The Takamba
Country: Mali
City: Timbuktu

Information
Takamba is music made for celebration; weddings mainly, but also birth and circumcision parties, harvest thanksgivings, festivities to mark the end of Ramadan and many other occasions of communal joy. Its driving force is the unmistakable takamba rhythm which pulses on the boom and bip before lurching at the end of every phrase, catching the uninitiated in mid-step. This beat is locked down by one or more players of the calabash, a species of over-sized died out pumpkin gourd that sounds like an entire drum kit in the hands of skilled player, with its deep booming bass thump and rattling ‘hi-hat’ click. Atop this sedate beat come the ngoni players. The ngoni is a three or four stringed lute. With generous historical license you could call it the great granddaddy of the blues guitar and you wouldn’t be too far wrong. The takamba musicians play the ngoni sitting down, with the instrument lying on the floor and one knee pressing down on its body.

Best time
After dinner, it normally takes place in a family."

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SHOWCASE VIDEOS
These videos are presented in chronological order with the video with the oldest publishing date given first.

Example #1: Des femmes de Tombouctou dansant le TAKAMBA



rakiaalphadi, Published on Sep 8, 2007

Cette vidéo présente des femmes de Tombouctou entrain de danser le "TAKAMBA" lors d'une fête donnée par l'ONG francomalienne Gouna Avenir de Tombouctou lors du départ de 20 jeunes de 18 a 25 ans, venus aider les jeunes de Tombouctou.

Example #2: Duet Calabash



Future Takamba Published on Aug 26, 2010

A calabash duet by the two calabash players of Super 11, Aliou Saloum Yattara and "Cola" Mahamadou Balobo Maiga. They play the core of the mesmerizing grooves performed by Future Takamba and are displaying here some core variations of the Takamba rhythm. August 18th, Bamako, Mali.

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Example #3: Super Onze - Super Onze



Future Takamba Published on Mar 15, 2011

Witness Mali's Takamba Band no. 1 Super 11 perform their anthem and title track Super Onze from their forthcoming album. Recorded next to the Niger, Segou, Mali.

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Example #4: Thiale Arby – Takamba

AfricaShowsMusic : 100% Musique Africaine Published on Mar 10, 2016

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Example #5: Spot On Mali Music presents SUPER ONZE



TorbenHolleuferGnawa, Published on Oct 14, 2016

The coolest band on the planet! I had the intense pleasure of filming and interviewing the legendary Super Onze from Gao in Mali some days before their concert on Spot On Mali Music 4 in Bamako, which took place on October 7-8, 2016. This is true Songhai music - takamba! Straight from the desert of north-east Mali. Filmed and produced by Torben Holleufer for Spot On Mali Music

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Example #6: Soirée Takamba au Centre Culturel Tumast - 14 Mai 2016



Abdoul Malick Almaïmoune Published on May 22, 2016

Le samedi 14 Mai 2016 dernier, l'Association Bourem Gomno a organisé une grande soirée Takamba au Centre Culturel Tumast sis à Torokorobougou (Bamako, Mali). Extrait vidéo de cette soirée.
-snip-
Google translate from French to English:
"On Saturday, May 14, 2016, the Association Bourem Gomno organized a great Takamba evening at the Tumast Cultural Center located in Torokorobougou (Bamako, Mali). Video extract of this evening."

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Example #7: Djeneba Seck chante Takamba à Gao - Mali Dje -



n'goniba, Published on Apr 30, 2017

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Wednesday, August 16, 2017

Historically Black Greek Letter Organizations' Custom Of Post-Graduation Stepping & Strolling - All BGLOs Active On Campus

Edited by Azizi Powell

This is the ninth post in a pancocojams series that showcases selected YouTube videos which document the post graduation custom among historically Black Greek lettered organizations of celebrating a member's or members' university graduation by spontaneously stepping or strolling or participating in a unity sing.

This pancocojams showcases two videos of post-graduation unity steps or strolls that are performed by all members of the National Pan-Hellenic Council, i.e the "Divine Nine") that are active at those particular university.

Click the "post graduation BGLO stepping and strolling" tag below for other pancocojams posts in this series.

The content of this post is presented for historical, cultural, and aesthetic purposes.

All copyrights remain with their owners.

Best wishes to all those whose graduations are documented in this post and thanks to all those who are featured in this post. Thanks also to the publishers of these videos.

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PANCOCOJAMS EDITOR'S COMMENT
This pancocojams series documents the seemingly spontaneous customs among members of historically Black Greek letter organization (BGLO) of celebrating their own university graduation and/or other members' university graduation immediately after the graduation ceremony by performing group strolls or group steps while singing certain organization songs and chants.

From the YouTube videos that I've found to date (August 2017), it also appears that instead of stepping or strolling, or as a prelude to those performance activities, sometimes members of historically Black Greek letter organizations also celebrate their graduation and other members' graduations by singing an organization hymn or hymns while standing in a unity circle. People forming the circle stand with linked arms (in the same manner of the "We Shall Overcome"), either with or without swaying back and forth that is done while singing that civil rights song. The songs that are sung during the unity circle may be classified as "organization hymns".

The songs and chants that are sung during these BGLO post-graduation activities appear to be usually ones that express the members' love for their organization, and their appreciation for and devotion to that organization, rather than those songs and chants that put down (diss) other BGLO fraternities or sororities or those songs/chants that focus on sexual topics. From watching YouTube videos of these BGLO post-graduation celebrations, it appears that the circle songs are more solemn than the strolling and stepping songs or chants. The video publishers of these BGLO graduation song videos often refer to these songs as "hymns".

From the videos that I've found to date, these BGLO post-graduation customs most often occur in the Southern region of the United States, which makes sense since that is the region where most historically Black colleges and universities are located. I've found more videos of this custom from FAMU (Florida A & M University) than any other university, which could suggests that these BGLO post-graduation customs might have originated at that university. However, there may be other explanations for the large number of YouTube videos from that university. And there are YouTube videos of these customs from other regions of the United States.

The YouTube videos that I have found document that these historically Black Greek letter organizations' post-graduation activities suggests that they usually spontaneously occur outdoors immediately after the graduation ceremony. However, there are some videos of stepping indoors in the auditorium at the end of the graduation ceremony, or stepping in the auditorium hallways after the graduation ceremony.

I don't know when these BGLO post-graduation customs began. My guess is that the standing in place circle singing began first. This guess is based in part on a comment from one of the showcased Kappa Alpha Psi' videos that includes the comment "Celebrating graduation with my boys the traditional way". And based on the history that I've read about historically Black Greek letter organizations, my guess is that the post-graduation custom of BGLO strolling started after the unity circle singing, and then the custom of stepping came later.

The earliest YouTube videos that I have which document these customs are from 2009 -a video of Alpha Kappa Alpha strolling at FAMU and a video of Iota Phi Theta doing their Centaur Walk step at BCU, Bethune Cookman University[?].

As these videos document, members of historically Black Greek letter organizations who are graduating from a university usually wear a kente cloth stole in the colors of their organization and with their organization's Greek letters. Graduating BGLO members may also wear a kente cloth stole with the red, black, green, and gold color combinations that may be the most familiar kente cloth combination among African Americans. A number of African Americans associate Ghana's and The Ivory Coast's traditional kente cloth and those particular color combinations with African cultural pride if not afrocentricity.

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SHOWCASE VIDEOS
Example #1: The Grad Stroll #FAMU



Benjamin Evans Published on May 2, 2012

No better place to graduate than Florida A & M University. Watch all the love from organizations, fraternities, sororities and families after graduation.

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Example #2: UA Graduation 2012: The Last Greek Stepshow



XLNB Published on May 10, 2012

At the end of every semester students graduate from every university looking towards the next step in their lives. Members of Greek fraternities and sororities, before saying their final farewells to the campus, set out a final march to signify the end of an era at their respective school.

At the University of Alabama this final step has become an iconic gesture on the steps of Coleman Coliseum. It's only fitting it's captured for posterity.

Shot By Xavier Burgin and Kevyn Bryant
quethelights.com
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Visitor comments are welcome.

Historically Black Greek Letter Organizations' Custom Of Post-Graduation Stepping & Strolling - Iota Phi Theta Fraternity, Inc.

Edited by Azizi Powell

This is the eighth post in a pancocojams series that showcases selected YouTube videos which document the post graduation custom among historically Black Greek lettered organizations of celebrating a member's or members' university graduation by spontaneously stepping or strolling or participating in a unity sing.

An additional post in this series also documents the custom in at least two universities of a historically Black Greek letter organization stroll that includes all or most of the nine member organizations of the National Pan-Hellenic Council.

This post showcases four YouTube videos of members of Iota Phi Theta Fraternity, Inc. performing post-graduation stepping, strolling, or unity circle singing.

Click the "post graduation BGLO stepping and strolling" tag below for other pancocojams posts in this series.

The content of this post is presented for historical, cultural, and aesthetic purposes.

All copyrights remain with their owners.

Best wishes to all those whose graduations are documented in this post and thanks to all those who are featured in this post. Thanks also to the publishers of these videos.

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PANCOCOJAMS EDITOR'S COMMENT
This pancocojams series documents the seemingly spontaneous customs among members of historically Black Greek letter organization (BGLO) of celebrating their own university graduation and/or other members' university graduation immediately after the graduation ceremony by performing group strolls or group steps while singing certain organization songs and chants.

From the YouTube videos that I've found to date (August 2017), it also appears that instead of stepping or strolling, or as a prelude to those performance activities, sometimes members of historically Black Greek letter organizations also celebrate their graduation and other members' graduations by singing an organization hymn or hymns while standing in a unity circle. People forming the circle stand with linked arms (in the same manner of the "We Shall Overcome"), either with or without swaying back and forth that is done while singing that civil rights song. The songs that are sung during the unity circle may be classified as "organization hymns".

The songs and chants that are sung during these BGLO post-graduation activities appear to be usually ones that express the members' love for their organization, and their appreciation for and devotion to that organization, rather than those songs and chants that put down (diss) other BGLO fraternities or sororities or those songs/chants that focus on sexual topics. From watching YouTube videos of these BGLO post-graduation celebrations, it appears that the circle songs are more solemn than the strolling and stepping songs or chants. The video publishers of these BGLO graduation song videos often refer to these songs as "hymns".

From the videos that I've found to date, these BGLO post-graduation customs most often occur in the Southern region of the United States, which makes sense since that is the region where most historically Black colleges and universities are located. I've found more videos of this custom from FAMU (Florida A & M University) than any other university, which could suggests that these BGLO post-graduation customs might have originated at that university. However, there may be other explanations for the large number of YouTube videos from that university. And there are YouTube videos of these customs from other regions of the United States.

The YouTube videos that I have found document that these historically Black Greek letter organizations' post-graduation activities suggests that they usually spontaneously occur outdoors immediately after the graduation ceremony. However, there are some videos of stepping indoors in the auditorium at the end of the graduation ceremony, or stepping in the auditorium hallways after the graduation ceremony.

I don't know when these BGLO post-graduation customs began. My guess is that the standing in place circle singing began first. This guess is based in part on a comment from one of the showcased Kappa Alpha Psi' videos that includes the comment "Celebrating graduation with my boys the traditional way". And based on the history that I've read about historically Black Greek letter organizations, my guess is that the post-graduation custom of BGLO strolling started after the unity circle singing, and then the custom of stepping came later.

The earliest YouTube videos that I have which document these customs are from 2009 -a video of Alpha Kappa Alpha strolling at FAMU and a video of Iota Phi Theta doing their Centaur Walk step at BCU, Bethune Cookman University[?].

As these videos document, members of historically Black Greek letter organizations who are graduating from a university usually wear a kente cloth stole in the colors of their organization and with their organization's Greek letters. Graduating BGLO members may also wear a kente cloth stole with the red, black, green, and gold color combinations that may be the most familiar kente cloth combination among African Americans. A number of African Americans associate Ghana's and The Ivory Coast's traditional kente cloth and those particular color combinations with African cultural pride if not afrocentricity.

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GENERAL DESCRIPTION OF THE FORMAT FOR POSTS IN THIS SERIES
This pancocojams series includes a post of videos of each BGLO performing these post-graduation customs*. These posts are published in the order of the date of that organization's founding.* With the exception of the post of Omega Psi Phi, Fraternity, all of the posts in this series showcase every post-graduation video of the featured BGLO that I have found to date (August 14, 2017).

I've also found two videos of post-graduation unity steps or strolls that are performed by all members of the National Pan-Hellenic Council, i.e the "Divine Nine") that are active at a particular university. Those videos are showcased in a separate post in this series.

*As of this date (August 15, 2017), I haven't found any YouTube post-graduation videos for members of Sigma Gamma Rho Sorority, Inc. However, it's likely that members of that organization also practice this custom. if you know of any Sigma Gamma Rho post-graduation videos, please share those links in the comment section below.

I've included no comments from these videos discussion threads and no editorial comments besides the locations of the university.

For the historical and folkloric record, in the near future I plan to try to add the names of songs/chants that are performed in these post graduation videos, as well as links to as many of the words to those songs/chants that I can find or that I can transcribe from these videos. Any help regarding that project would be greatly appreciated.

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SHOWCASE VIDEOS
Example #1: BCU Iotas Centaur Walking at Graduation



americandream1Published on May 31, 2009
-snip-
"BCU" - Bethune-Cookman University (Daytona Beach Florida) ?

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Example #2: Iota Phi Theta - Centaur Walk & UF Graduation Fall 2010


tonystark1963 Published on May 6, 2010

My Fall 2010 graduation & another brother at the University of Florida (Gamma Omicron Chapter). We also did the Centaur Walk after.

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Example #3: Michigan state Iotas centaur walk for the graduating bruhs



RO5TAILCLUB, Published on May 4, 2013

Centaur walk at the Breslin center
=snip-
locaton- Michigan State University

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Example #4: DeathRow Iotas 2017 Graduation



UAlbany Iotas Published on May 23, 2017

On behalf of the brothers of the Delta Rho "DeathRow" Chapter of Iota Phi Theta Fraternity Inc. , we would like to congratulate brothers Jarius Jemmott, Matthew Sierra, Richard Ogarro, Nathan Honegan, Cameron Crawley and Nicholas Reyes for graduating SUNY Albany with their Bachelor's Degrees. Keep paving the way brothers. OW OW!
-snip-
location - Albany University (Albany, Georgia) ?

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Visitor comments are welcome.